Blue Tit Plum Info – How To Grow A Blue Tit Plum Tree


By: Tonya Barnett, (Author of FRESHCUTKY)

Coming in a wide range of colors and sizes, plums are an excellent addition to the garden landscape, as well as to small-scale home orchards. Variations among plum trees may make the process of choosing which plum tree to incorporate into the garden an extremely difficult task. Luckily, with today’s selection in cultivars, growers are often able to find fruit trees that are well-suited and thrive in their garden’s unique microclimate. One such tree, the ‘Blue Tit’ plum, demonstrates disease resistance, as well as high yields of firm, fleshy plums.

Blue Tit Plum Tree Info

Blue Tit plums are a self-fertile (self-fruitful) variety of dark plums. Simply, self-fertile fruit trees are able to be planted as standalone plants in the garden. Unlike some other cultivars, this means that it will not be required to plant an additional variety of plum tree to ensure pollination of the plum crop. This makes them ideal candidates for smaller yards and beginner fruit growers.

These yellow-fleshed plums are sweet and great for use in both baking and for fresh eating. As with most types of plum, the best tasting fruits are those which have been allowed to thoroughly ripen on the tree before they have been harvested. This will ensure the sweetest possible flavor.

Growing a Blue Tit Plum Tree

As with choosing to add any fruit tree to the garden, there are some factors to consider before planting. Most notably, these plums will require a moderate amount of space to truly thrive. Depending upon the rootstock, Blue Tit plums can reach heights as tall as 16 feet (5 m.). Planting at proper spacing will allow for better air circulation surrounding the plant, and ultimately, support the development of healthier fruit trees.

Planting this tree is very similar to other types of plum. Blue Tit trees may be difficult to find at local nurseries and garden centers. Therefore, many growers may choose to order the fruit tree saplings online. When doing so, always order from a reputable source to ensure the arrival of healthy and disease-free transplants.

Blue Tit trees will need to be planting in a well-draining location that receives ample amounts of direct sunlight each day. When preparing to transplant the young trees, soak the root ball in water for at least one hour before planting. Dig and amend a hole that is at least twice as wide and deep as the root ball of the sapling. Gently place the tree into the hole and begin to fill it in, making sure not to cover the collar of the tree. After planting, water thoroughly.

Once established, incorporate a consistent routine of irrigation and pruning. Proper home orchard maintenance and management will not only help to avoid many common fruit stressors, but also help to prevent stress related issues.

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How To Plant a Plum Tree (continued - page 3)

Where To Grow Your Plum Tree
Firstly, plan the position of the plum tree according to its eventual size at maturity (click on the left hand Plum Quick Index for 'Size of Plum Trees'). Allow enough room so that it is not crowded.

Plums have three main needs, warmth (especially important at pollination time, light and moisture. Plums flower earlier in the season than most other fruit trees, so they should not be planted in a frost-pocket. If your garden is in a cool area, avoid early flowering varieties - good varieties to choose are Czar, Victoria or Marjorie's Seedling.

Plum trees prefer to be positioned in full sun, although some shade in the morning or afternoon will not affect them much.

As far as moisture is concerned, do not plant in a water-logged area, but make sure the soil is unlikely to dry out. Don't plant them near other trees which will simply deprive them of the moisture they need.

Planting Your Plum Tree
Technically, you can plant your plum tree any time from late Autumn to early Spring. The best time to plant is in October when the soil is moist but still retains some of the summer warmth.

Soil preparation is best done a month or more before planting so that the soil has time to settle. Dig a 60cm (2ft) deep by 1.2m (4ft) square hole, incorporating as much organic material as possible - aim to get the soil crumbly.

On the left (click to enlarge) is a picture of a one year old bare-rooted plum tree. It is the variety Blue Tit on Pixy rootstock.

It was delivered (ordered online) in excellent condition from Blackmoor Nurseries in early January. The tree was undamaged, labelled correctly and the roots were still moist.

We recommend this nursery very highly. Click here to go to their website.

Excuse the angle, it's the picture tilting not the tree!

Click the picture to enlarge it. This is the tree planted on the allotment. Note that the joint between the scion and rootstock (the joint near the bottom of the main stem) is 5cm (2in) plus above ground.

If the tree is being planted in soil which has previously been fertilised for other crops, do not add more fertiliser - too fertile a soil will result in too much tree growth at the expense of too little fruit growth. If the plum tree is being planted in a lawn, prepare as above, working in three handfuls of bonemeal or other long-lasting fertiliser.

Planting is simple - in basic terms, dig a hole large enough to easily take the roots, place the tree in the hole and cover the roots with soil up to the surrounding ground level. Simple enough, but bear in mind a few points.

Don't add any fertiliser to the soil at this time - it may burn the roots and it will only encourage tree growth at the expense of fruit growth.

The tree should be planted to the same depth as it was in the pot (or the soil mark on the trunk in the case of bare-rooted trees). If in doubt, make sure that the joining point between the rootstock and scion is at least 5cms (2in) above ground level (see left). Having planted the tree, firm down the soil using your boots to ensure the soil is in good contact with the roots - water well if the conditions are dry.

Plum trees should be supported with a stake for the first couple of years of their life. The stake should be 15cm (6in) or so from the main stem. Tie the trunk to the stake at 30cm (1ft) intervals using plastic ties available from garden centres - do not use wire or anything which could cut into the tree trunk. The ties will need to be checked for the first couple of years to ensure that growth of the tree trunk has not caused them to become too tight.

Name: NORA
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: October 18, 2011 - 08:19 pm
Message: I PLANTED MY PLUM TREE BACK IN MARCH 2010. THE TREE IS ABOUT 8FT. TALL. I HAVE SEEN THE BLOOMING STAGES TWICE BUT NO FRUIT. EVERYTHING LOOKS HEALTHY OR. AM I MISSING SOMETHING? LAREDO,TX

Name: Magdalena
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: September 23, 2011 - 04:45 pm
Message: Hello, I'm from Spain. My mother is looking for some information about the plum tree, special in "Prunus Domestica Italica", Reina Claudia. If we sow a stone of this fruit, the tree that will born will be of the same species or if the fruit will be different? Can you help us please? My english is not very good, sorry. Thanks.

Name: sharon
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: September 12, 2011 - 12:11 pm
Message: our plun plants have been sprayed with a chinchbug spray could that kill them?

Name: clare korb
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: August 23, 2011 - 07:43 pm
Message: My Victoria type plum is about 10 yrs old. for three years it produced abundantly. I 2010 the blossoms blew off before maturity. 2011 it received a great deal of moisture and has grown to tremendous height, a great deal of foliage. The fruit is larger than before but less in quantity. I harvested the fruit today. I like to steam the fruit, pitted or unpitted. What a drink! MY question is. How much can I prune it and when?

please advise. It is fun to read your comments and advice

Name: p pascoe
E-mail: Private
Date posted: August 12, 2011 - 08:43 am
Message: can you get a plum tree planting a plum stone and how long will it take to grow

Name: Vincent
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: June 27, 2011 - 03:38 pm
Message: Hello,

I Planted a Toka Plum tree two years ago. Now it is 10'tall and very healthy looking with rich green leaves. It bloomed early in April, but no fruits at all. It is the most thriving tree of all the trees I have on my yard. I live in Minnesota.

Can anyone please tell me how long does it take for the Toka Plum tree to yield fruits?

Name: james
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: June 25, 2011 - 05:23 pm
Message: I am about to plant a TOKA plum tree and a SUPERIOR plum tree but cannot find out how far apart to plant them. Can't find anyone that knows the width at maturity. Can you help, please.

Name: gary
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: June 24, 2011 - 09:12 am
Message: Thanks i only started growing plan and tree this year and found your site a very good help to me thanks again gary

Name: sunwukong
E-mail: Private
Date posted: January 17, 2011 - 10:41 pm
Message: What fruit tree seeds need a hard freeze before they are planted?

Name: Marina Gregoriou
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: October 14, 2010 - 08:11 am
Message: Can you let me know when it is the best time to plant fruit trees, mainly apples & pears please

Name: donna
E-mail: Private
Date posted: September 09, 2010 - 03:54 am
Message: Ricky, i live in alice springs myself whether this is the same "hot redding ca" as you are - i am looking at getting a plum tree myself. Have heard mixed comments on how plum's do here, some say they grow good as long as you fertilise it well other people say it is to hot for them here. No green thumb myself, maybe it just needs time to adapt to the soil.

Name: Ricky barcus
E-mail: Private
Date posted: August 16, 2010 - 09:49 pm
Message: I am no green thumb but i read alot before planting my Thundercloud flowering Plum tree. i planted it in late late spring I live in hot redding ca it grew new leaves in two weeks then fell off the tree is bare now and the smallest of the branches are crispy but i belive the tree is still alive the bigger branches are still bendy i water it every night i hope the tree makes it please help !


Plum ‘Blue Tit’ Cultivar: Growing A Blue Tit Plum At Home - garden

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Plum Tree Varieties
(continued - page 2)

Choosing Your Plum Tree (continued)

TASTE
The best way to make a decision on taste, is to understand a little about the variety of plums available.
Bullace - strictly a cooking plum. The trees are smaller than normal and very hardy, they are also ornamental. The fruit has a very sharp flavour, excellent for jams and preserving.

Damson - another cooking plum, but sweeter than the bullace. The fruits are have a sharpish taste and are ideal for pies, tarts and jams.
Plum - some are cooking and some are eating. These make up some of the best plums for the UK climate.
Gage - eating (desert) plums. These are some of the the sweetest form of plum and they have a distinct 'plum' fragrance.

RECOMMENDED VARIETIES
Taste is a matter of personal preference, GardenAction list below some popular varieties of plum which you may wish to consider.
Click on the plum variety names below for a picture.

Blue Tit
(plum)
Self-fertile Bred in 1995 "Blue Tit" has an award of Garden Merit ( ) from the RHS.

As you will see if click on the name for the picture this is a real blue plum. The flavour is good and the shape is regular. This plum variety is self fertile, crops regularly in large amounts during August.

Bred by Thomas Rivers in 1870. It is a cross between Prince Englebert x Early Prolific. It was named in honour of the Russian Emperor visiting at the time.

A good eating plum that produces medium-sized round or oval purple plums of good flavour. The flesh is yellow-green and very juicy. It is a good-cropper and hardier than most varieties

Dennistons
Superb
(gage)
Self-fertile A great tasting gage, Denniston's Superb is amongst the best as far as eating plums go.

The pale green skin is tinged with a red flush. It reliably produces a good crop of plums in late summer.

Bred by Laxton's of Bedford, it was first appeared in 1916 and was immediately awarded a Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

Cooker and eater but best for cooking. Medium-sized fruit, tinged with pink. Sweet and juicy. The earliest of all plums, producing fruit in early August .

Jefferson
(gage)
Pollinate with A very reliable cropper producing largish juicy gages in mid August.

Raised by Burleydam Nurseries of Staffordshire. The plum tree was then sold to a Mr. C. Sykes of Bricklehampton, Worcestershire. His marriage was obviously a happy one because he named it after his wife, Marjorie.

A great eating plum, it produces fruit from mid September . Unusually, this plum keeps very well in the fridge, extending the eating period by up to 4 weeks .

Large oval blue-black plums. Juicy yellow flesh with a good flavour. A vigorous tree which produces a large number of plums.

Old English Greengage
(gage)

Pollinate with
Czar or Victoria

Named after Sir William Gage who imported this variety to the UK in 1724.

This is the best taste of all varieties. The colourless flesh is full of flavour and juicy - a real treat. This is not a high yielding variety.

A chance seedling found in a garden at Alderton Sussex. Introduced by Denyer of Brixton, London in 1840.

A popular variety with large fruits, and an excellent taste. The flesh is green to yellow and very juicy. A heavy cropper, producing fruit in September . Click here if you want to buy this plum tree online.


POLLINATION
Some plum tress are self-fertile, but many require a compatible plum tree nearby (plum trees are not so common as apple trees) for pollination to occur. Plum trees have a short and very distinct pollination period (almost exactly ten days) so if you choose a tree which is not self-fertile, be sure to also choose a compatible tree. This is especially important if you choose a 'gage'.

Click here to see which varieties are self-fertile and those which are not self-fertile (compatible varieties are listed to help you choose a partner for your plum tree if necessary).

Name: Gamal Salib
E-mail: Private
Date posted: September 18, 2011 - 11:05 am
Message: Could you please tell me how and when to prune an apple tree.
Thanks

Name: carol
E-mail: Private
Date posted: August 04, 2011 - 06:50 am
Message: Hi, we are moving into a house that has a large plum tree, greeny coloured skin with a hint of red. We have picked some of them which are very sweet but found small black marks on them and actually found a small maggot in one, what should I do? are they not edible and how can I treat them? I have noticed that there are a lot of rotten fruit on the tree which is in the garden of a house that has been unoccupied for 18 month. Thank you.

Name: joan bowman
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: August 01, 2011 - 05:51 am
Message: In a field near us
yellow fruit small size of a damson with stone in middle like a small plum now very ripe, what are they? and can they be eaten
Thank You

Name: neil
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: June 24, 2011 - 05:40 am
Message: Hello, I am involved in a new community orchard on our green. The plum trees are standards that are bowing over a good deal and I feel may have snapped off in recent winds. We have removed the fruit to reduce the weight for the first year.Do the trees need to be staked or supported in some way, or perhaps cut back, if so when?
thanks for any advice

Name: mike manley
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: June 08, 2011 - 06:55 pm
Message: Will Chinese Plums grow in Oklahoma?

Name: Malu
E-mail: Private
Date posted: June 05, 2011 - 12:36 am
Message: How far have to plant out from the house the small plum tree?

Name: james
E-mail: Private
Date posted: January 17, 2011 - 02:59 pm
Message: what plum tree has pink blossoms and maroon leaves, and when do you plant them?

Name: Brian Slade
E-mail: Private
Date posted: October 29, 2010 - 01:02 pm
Message: Can someone please tell me where I can buy a Dunster plum tree?

Name: bill may
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: August 30, 2010 - 04:43 am
Message: hi i have a plum tree and the fruit have small maggoty inside

Name: G P Singers
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: August 30, 2010 - 01:11 am
Message: Hi I have a satsuma plum tree because of the weather condtions can i hand pollinate it regards Graham

Name: Mr D. Heaven
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: August 28, 2010 - 04:05 pm
Message: Many roadside trees with small yellow and red ( plums ). About 1 & 1/2" seem ripe end August, taste fairly sweet. Are the o k to eat or bottle with gin or vodka ?

Name: David
E-mail: [email protected]
Date posted: August 07, 2010 - 01:43 pm
Message: We moved into our present house 26 years ago. In the back garden were 3 trees an apple tree, cherry tree and another tree, after 26 years the other tree is covered with plums and is about 20 ft high, all the plums are at least above 10 ft up the tree nothing on the lower branches, is this a normal behaviour of the plum tree .

Name: Jane Lee
E-mail: Private
Date posted: August 03, 2010 - 01:32 am
Message: My friend has a "Spiro Plum" tree which she bought from Dave Wilson Nursery many years ago. I like to buy one also, but where can I find one? I live in the Sacramento, CA area. Thank you.


Plum ‘Blue Tit’ Cultivar: Growing A Blue Tit Plum At Home - garden

Fruit trees for sale | Plum Fruit Trees.

Blackmoor Nursery is one of very few Nurseries in the UK offering gardeners the opportunity to buy Plum fruit trees direct from our Nursery.

All orders are despatched in one delivery. If your order contains both bare root and container grown plants then we can only despatch when all plants are ready.

Any Bare Root Plum fruit trees - Availability means available for supply from Nov to May.

Any Container grown Plum fruit trees - Availability means vailable for supply now.

How tall will my Plum tree grow?

Plum Fruit trees are grafted onto rootstocks. Rootstocks come in 5 sizes (2 for Plum trees) see the chart below, all of our fruit trees are labelled using these codes.

VVA-1 - Rootstock for Plum trees.
Dwarf 2.5 metres when mature. The new dwarfing rootstock for Plum trees that has replaced Pixy.

St Julien A (SJA) - Rootstock for Plum trees.
Semi dwarfing, Approximate height 3.5-4 metres when mature.

Bare Root = Field grown trees that have been freshly lifted and supplied with no soil around the roots. Only available during the dormant period November-April.

10 Litre = Container grown and can be planted all year round. The size refers to the number of litres of compost that the container holds.
1 Year Maiden = A one year old tree and the size depends on the variety but in general they will be 100-125cm in height.
2 Year Bush = A two year old tree that has been pruned back in the first winter to form a bush shape. Generally trees will be 140-160cm in height with multiple side branches. This height guide is an end of summer height.

Fan trained Plums - Trees grow to an eventual height of around 2 m (7 ft). Although the shortest of all the forms, they will grow to a width of around 3 m and are really only a practical proposition when grown against a wall or fence.

Pollination Made Simple

Most suburban situations provide good pollen due to the close proximity of other gardens. It is not always necessary to have pollinators if the bees and other pollinating insects are generous with their visits. If you have no other Plum tree close by then select two varieties in the same group or the adjoining group ie group B and D will pollinate group C as will any others in group C. Some Plum varieties are self fertile.


Diarmuid Gavin: A plum job

September 17 2017 02:30 AM

Autumn is the season of harvest - the vegetable beds are full of greens and root crops - but also exciting are the fruits coming to fruition! I've just spent a week boating along the River Lot in southwest France, and every hamlet where we moored up for the evening seemed to have communal gardens teeming with produce. Juicy grapes hung from vines waiting to be pressed and turned into Malbec. Odd cucumber-shaped squashes were being harvested and turned into vegetable- based cakes, and pumpkins wore their orange colour proudly as they absorbed some late sunny rays.

A t home, our fruit trees are laden with goodies plumping up by the day. It's always at this time of the year that I hope for an extended season of sun to ensure that they ripen on the branch, ready for eating, cooking or storage.

I've long grown apples, pears and cherries, but seeing all this fruity inspiration has begun to make me consider what else I should grow. So now I'm beginning to put my mind towards plums. They're a versatile and delicious fruit and can be turned into jams, chutneys, crumbles, pies, wine and ice-cream.

Planning is very important if you're going to develop a fruit garden. It takes thought and time to consider the choices available and weigh up what's appropriate for the needs of your household. What fruit will you use or what will you end up letting rot or giving away? This week, my exercise is making decisions about the type of plum I'd like to grow and recommend.

There are a few different types of plum: dessert plums, which are sweet and juicy culinary plums, which need cooking to make them palatable greengage, which are the smaller, yellow-greenish fruits, and damsons, which are good for jam-making.

Gardeners can sometimes be reluctant to grow plums - they flower early so blossoms are prone to frost, therefore it's best to plant them in the sunniest, warmest part of the garden. Avoid known frost pockets and areas of cold wind and, if necessary, cover with horticultural fleece in winter to protect them.

Alternatively, you can grow varieties that blossom a little later, such as Prunus domestica 'Marjorie's Seedling', which is a lovely purple culinary plum. 'Blue Tit', a blue-skinned plum, is also suitable for more northerly regions, as well as the classic, much-loved 'Victoria'.

Choose a self-pollinating variety such as 'Victoria' and 'Czar' unless you have neighbours who also grow plums.

Before planting, prepare the ground well. Plums are thirsty and hungry plants so they need a well-nourished, moisture-retentive and free-draining soil - they don't like to be waterlogged. So, regular readers of this page will know this means plenty of compost and/or well-rotted manure and mulching in spring to help keep moisture in the soil during dry spells.

You can plant container-grown all year round but, as the bare-root season approaches, this is the less expensive option and the plants will establish more quickly. Order now for planting in November through to March. And be patient - it will take a couple of years for your first crop.

Plum trees can easily outgrow a small garden so choose one grown on dwarf rootstock such as 'Pixy' or 'VVA-1', which will restrict the size to 8-10ft. Alternatively, you can grow them in a fan shape against a sunny wall.

Thin the fruit in May and June to ensure fat plums. This means leaving an inch or so between each fruit, discarding smaller fruitlets. As plums get ripe, they become heavy and, without thinning branches, can snap under their own weight.

If you need to prune, do so only in June and July but never in winter, as silver leaf disease - which they are prone to - can enter through the cut this way.

Other pests include bullfinches, who love to pick off and eat dormant buds in winter, so you may need to net your tree if this is a problem.

Wasp traps in summer can help if wasps are a nuisance. Fruit with white pustules are indicative of fungus (brown rot) so remove them from the tree and windfalls on the ground. 'Czar' has some resistance to this fungus.

Finally, watch out for caterpillars, who will try to eat your juicy produce. Hanging pheromone traps can catch moths and prevent them breeding these little maggots - and, again, remove any infected fruit from the ground to disrupt their reproductive cycle.


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