Grass Pollinators: How To Create A Bee-Friendly Yard


By: Darcy Larum, Landscape Designer

So you’ve created pollinator friendly flower beds in your yard and are feeling pretty good about what you’ve done to help our environment. Then in midsummer or early fall, you spot a few brown, dead patches in your pristine lawn, most likely caused by grubs. You rush out and buy chemical grub control and douse your lawn, thinking only of killing those darn grubs, not the potential damage it could also cause our pollinators.

With the fate of many pollinators hanging in the balance these days, it may be time to reconsider the pure grass, well-trimmed lawn and start creating pollinator friendly lawns instead. This article will help with how to create a bee-friendly yard.

Creating Pollinator Friendly Lawn Grass

Before the invention of the lawn mower in the 1830’s, only rich aristocrats had large perfectly manicured grassy lawn areas for entertaining outdoors. It was a sign of stature to be able to have an open lawn that didn’t need to be used for crop production. These lawns were usually kept trimmed by goats or hand cut by scythe. Middle and lower class families coveted these lawns of the wealthy.

Perhaps this longing for a perfectly trimmed, lush, green lawn is embedded in our DNA even now, as we compete with our neighbors to have the best lawn on the block. However, the insecticides, herbicides, and fertilizers we dump on our lawns can be extremely harmful to pollinators. Systemic lawn insecticides cause nearby flowers and their pollen to contain these chemicals, which weaken bees’ immunity or kills them.

Creating pollinator friendly lawns means allowing your lawn grasses to grow three inches (8 cm.) long or taller, forming flower heads and seeds to attract pollinators. This longer grass also helps the lawn retain moisture. A bee-friendly lawn will also need to contain some weeds and non-grassy plants to attract pollinators. Pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers should not be used on pollinator friendly lawns. These new lawn practices may not exactly make you the most popular person in the neighborhood, but you’ll be helping out important pollinating insects.

Grass Pollinators

Most lawn grasses are actually pollinated by the wind, however, a pollinator friendly lawn grass should contain other low-growing plants besides grasses. Some good lawn plants for pollinators include:

  • White clover
  • Heal all (Prunella)
  • Creeping thyme
  • Bird’s foot trefoil
  • Lilyturf
  • Violets
  • Roman chamomile
  • Squill
  • Corsican mint
  • Brass buttons
  • Dianthus
  • Mazus
  • Stonecrop
  • Ajuga
  • Lamium

Fescues and Kentucky bluegrass will also attract pollinators when left to grow three inches (8 cm.) or taller.

Placing bee hotels around your lawn will also attract native pollinators. It may take a little time to get a bee-friendly lawn established but will be well worth it in the long run. It may take even longer to get used to not using pesticides, herbicides, or cutting the lawn every week. In the end though, regardless of what the neighbors whisper about you, you can pat yourself on the back for doing your part to help our environment.

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Please the bees: how to keep your garden pollinator-friendly

With the weather warming up, are you itching to get outside and work on your garden?

According to local pollination experts, you should hang on a little while longer before tending to your flower beds.

Orillia is one of 32 Bee City Canada communities in Ontario and residents might be wondering how to make their personal gardens more pollinator-friendly.

Anja Lowrance, a Simcoe County Master Gardener, has some advice.

“There were a lot of people doing that this weekend, raking up the leaves and debris that was left behind. When they’re doing that, they’re picking up many of the insects and are basically just putting them in the trash,” said Lowrance.

“When you clean up in the spring, you should wait until there’s been enough time for all those insects to wake up, and that usually means you have consistent daytime temperatures of about 10 C,” she said.

When dealing with hollow-stemmed plants, Lowrance said gardeners should employ a “chop and drop” method, where any discarded foliage is left on the ground, providing natural mulch or compost for the grass.

“It would also leave tubes that some of the solitary bees could use as nests,” she said.

Lowrance also said you should avoid walking on your lawn until the temperatures get a little higher, because it can damage your grass.

When you’re starting to decide on which plants you’d like to bring in to your garden this season, Jessica Lehr, one of the founders of Pollinate Collingwood, also has ideas on which plants will encourage pollination.

“Our big message is to try to add some native pollinator plants. We’re not asking people to rip up their gardens, but maybe just add some more diversity, which increases biodiversity,” said Lehr. “They’re going to thrive really well and won’t need as much upkeep as other plants.”

Some examples of native plants that will grow well in Simcoe County are Milkweed, which attracts Monarch butterflies or Pearly Everlasting, which will attract American painted lady butterflies. Mourning cloak butterflies are attracted to Pussy Willows.

Native shrubs will also encourage pollination. Like species should also be grouped together in the garden whenever possible.

According to Lehr, pollinators – including bees, butterflies, beetles and flies – are important for supporting healthy environments and pollinating many of the fruits and vegetables that we eat.

The Master Gardeners of Ontario is a non-profit volunteer organization comprised of individuals who are certified horticultural experts providing in-depth sustainable gardening information to the general public. For more information on how to become a Simcoe County Master Gardener, click here.


How to Create and Design a Pollinator Garden (Bee Friendly Garden Design)

Why plant a pollinator garden?

When you plant for pollinators, you get to enjoy those beautiful, graceful creatures and all their benefits. Plus, you’ll feel good about what you’re doing.

Learn the step-by-step instructions to design a garden plan for pollinators.

  1. Plan where you’ll plant.
    To create a pollinator garden, you don’t need much space. And you certainly don’t need to abandon your previous garden plan. Instead, see where you have room for new plants or spots you could replace plants. Pick areas that aren’t too windy. Pollinators don’t like that!
  2. Go native.
    Pollinators are naturally much more attracted to native plants rather than hybrids. The bees will be happy, and you will, too! Natives plants are often low-maintenance since they’ve adapted to thrive in your region.
  3. Use different colors and textures to mix it up.
    The more color and texture, the better! Bees like blue, purple, yellow and white. Butterflies prefer red, yellow, orange, pink and purple blooms. And birds like many of the same colors, like red, pink, orange, yellow and blue.
  4. Always have blooms in your garden.
    Different flowers bloom at different times, so make sure pollinators always have something to eat in your garden. When picking plants, map out when they bloom, and fill in any gaps in timing.
  5. Plant lots of pollinator-friendly plants together.
    Plant in groups of five to seven. When you group colors and flowers together, pollinators find them easier. Plus, bees prefer to pollinate one type of flower at a time. When the flowers are close together, they can pollinate quickly while not using much energy. Win-win.
  6. Choose from this pollinator plant list.

  • Aster – especially calico aster, New England aster, sky blue aster, or smooth blue aster (zones 4-8)
  • Blazing star – especially meadow blazing star or prairie blazing star (zones 3-9)
  • Boneset (zones 4-8)
  • Bottle gentian (zones 3-6)
  • Compass plant (zones 3-9)
  • Coneflower – especially purple coneflower or yellow coneflower (zones 3-9)
  • Cup plant (zones 4-8)
  • Dotted mint (zones 3-10)
  • Golden Alexanders (zones 3-8)
  • Goldenrod – especially showy goldenrod or stiff goldenrod (zones 4-5 7-9)
  • Great blue lobelia (zones 4-9)
  • Hoary verbena (zones 3-8)
  • Lance-leaf coreopsis (zones 4-9)
  • Lavender hyssop (zones 2-6)
  • Maximilian sunflower (zones 3-9)
  • Milkweed – especially butterfly milkweed, common milkweed or swamp milkweed
  • Ohio spiderwort (zones 4-9)
  • Partridge pea (zones 3-9)
  • Prairie ironweed (zones 3-7)
  • Purple prairie clover (zones 3-8)
  • Rattlesnake master (zones 3-8)
  • Smooth penstemon (zones 3-8)
  • Sweet Joe Pye weed (zones 3-8)
  • Virginia mountain mint (zones 3-7)
  • White wild indigo (zones 4-9)
  • Wild bergamot (zones 3-8)
  • Wild lupine (zones 3-8)
  • Yarrow (zones 4-9)

Bee sure to include some trees that attract pollinators, too!

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Designing Pollinator-Friendly Landscapes

by Annie S. White

A landscape rich with a diversity of flowering plants is both beautiful and helps support the thousands of species of bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, and other pollinating insects we have in the U.S. However, planning your pollinator-friendly landscape does not end with your plant list. The layout of your gardens, layout of your plants, and your maintenance practices all affect pollinators. Here is a set of considerations for choosing the best types of plants for pollinators, plus how to use them to create the best pollinator sanctuary possible.

Research suggests that most pollinators prefer to forage—but not necessarily exclusively—on the nectar and pollen from native plants. There are plenty of non-native species that are also great for pollinators, so it is not necessary to avoid them altogether, but incorporating more native plants into your landscape will make the pollinators, as well as the birds and other wildlife, happiest. A typical suburban landscape contains only 20-30% native plant species. Try reversing that trend in your own landscape by using 70-80% native species.

A pollinator-friendly landscape has flowers in bloom throughout the entire growing season, providing a consistent supply of nectar and pollen. When choosing plants, it is especially important to have plants that bloom early in the spring, such as a serviceberry tree (Amelanchier spp.) or wild columbine (Aquilegia canadensis), and late in the fall, such as Asters (Symphyotrichum spp.). In addition to perennial flowers, many flowering trees and shrubs, annuals, and spring bulbs are also beneficial to pollinators.

The size, shape, and color of flowering plants all influence what types of pollinating insects will visit, so planting a diversity of flowers is the best way to attract a diversity of pollinators. For example, bees are more attracted to purple, yellow, and white flowers and less attracted to red flowers. However, red flowers, such as scarlet bee balm (Monarda didyma) and cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), are magnets for butterflies and hummingbirds.

Many of our small native bees prefer to forage on small flowers such as yarrow (Achillea spp.) or composite flowers comprised of many tiny florets, like purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea). Bumblebees are big and strong, allowing them to pry their way inside larger flowers such as wild indigo (Baptisia spp.) that are difficult for other bees to access. Planting a variety of flower shapes and sizes will ensure all pollinators are well fed.

Some moths and butterflies also use plants in our gardens as host plants to rear their young. The monarch butterfly will feed on the nectar of many flowers but will only lay their eggs on the leaves of milkweed (Asclepias spp.). Include host plants such as marsh milkweed (Asclepias incarnata), butterfly milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), and wild lupine (Lupinus perennis) in your gardens to help support rare butterflies.

When shopping for native plants at nurseries and garden centers, you will find that there are numerous cultivars available for native plants. For example if you are looking for purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), you may find dozens of cultivars such as Echinacea purpurea ‘PowWow Wild Berry’ and Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan.’ Research has shown that some cultivars are not as attractive to pollinators as their wild ancestors, so choose cultivars carefully. As a general rule of thumb it is best to avoid hybrid cultivars, double-flowered cultivars, and cultivars that have a dramatic change in color or flower shape.

Ask your nursery if the plants you are buying have been treated with a systemic insecticide, such as neonicotinoids, within the last year. Scientists are currently studying and debating how dangerous these common insecticides are for bees, especially honeybees. But here is what we already know: systemic insecticides are absorbed into the plant’s tissues and can be transported to the nectar and pollen. High concentrations can be fatal to bees, butterflies, and other insect pollinators, and lower concentrations may affect their health and well-being. If your gardening efforts are motivated by a desire to support pollinator populations, it is best to avoid buying plants that have been treated with systemic insecticides, and of course, avoid applying insecticides in your landscape as well.

Many bee pollinators prefer to forage on the nectar and pollen from a single plant species during their foraging outings. Bee biologists call this “flower constancy.” Therefore, grouping plants in single-species masses of five to seven plants is more advantageous for the bees than having just one or two plants or dispersing them throughout the landscape.

Having pollinator-friendly flowering plants is just one aspect to creating a permanent habitat in your yard. Pollinators also need homes to raise their families. Honeybees are the only species that live in human-constructed hives. Of the 4,000 species of native bees we have here in the U.S. about 70% nest in burrows in the ground and the rest build their homes in hollowed twigs or pithy stems.

Preserving bare areas of well-drained soil in sunny locations and minimizing the use of mulch will help ground-nesting bees find permanent homes in your gardens. Brush piles and dead or dying trees and shrubs also make great homes for pollinators, but if you like your landscape neat and tidy, you can make (or purchase) pollinator-nesting boxes. A water source, such as a birdbath with a shallow area, is also an appreciated addition to any pollinator-friendly landscape.

You have probably noticed that you see more bees and butterflies in your garden on warm, sunny, and calm days. You can create microclimates within your landscape that will keep the bees buzzing even on not-so-perfect days. A garden space that is rich with a diversity of flowering plants and also has good southeastern exposure for morning and mid-day sun and is protected from prevailing winds is the perfect sanctuary for pollinators.

Here are a few more design tips for creating beautiful and pollinator-friendly landscapes:


Creating Pollinator Friendly Lawns - Choosing Lawn Plants For Pollinators - garden


Tiger swallowtail butterfly on purple coneflower. Photo by Jim Hudgins/USFWS.

We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service know that pollinators are the engine that run healthy habitats. While we’ve been actively working to restore and conserve more than 1.3 million acres of land across the midwest, we need your help. Whether you have a few feet on your apartment balcony or several acres, you can make a difference. Follow this easy step-by-step guide to build your own pollinator garden and help ensure the future is filled with pollinators.

Planning your garden


Hummingbird clearwing moth visiting a wild bergamot flower. Photo by Rick Hansen/USFWS.

Careful planning is essential to creating a successful pollinator garden. Follow these easy steps to make sure you have everything covered before you make your investment.

Choosing your location

While flowering plants can grow in both shady and sunny locations, consider your audience. Butterflies and other pollinators like to bask in the sun and some of their favorite wildflowers grow best in full or partial sun with some protection from the wind.

Identifying soil type and sunlight

Take a look at your soil - is it sandy and well-drained or more clay-like and wet? You can turn over a test patch or check out the soil mapper for your county to learn more. Your soil type and the amount of sunlight it gets will help determine the kinds of plants you can grow.

Choosing your plants

Research which varieties of milkweed and wildflowers are native to your area and do well in your soil and sunlight conditions. Native plants are the ideal choice, because they require less maintenance and tend to be heartier. Find a nursery that specializes in native plants near you - they’ll be familiar with plants that are meant to thrive in your part of the country. It’s essential to choose plants that have not been treated with pesticides, insecticides or neonicotinoids. You’ll also want to focus on selecting perennials to ensure your plants come back each year and don’t require a lot of maintenance.

Remember to think about more than just the summer growing season. Pollinators need nectar early in the spring, throughout the summer and even into the fall. Choosing plants that bloom at different times will help you create a bright and colorful garden that both you and pollinators will love for months!

Seeds vs. plants

Once you’ve identified your plant species, you’ll need to decide whether to use seeds or start with small plants. While both are good options, your choice will depend on your timeline and budget. Seeds are more economical, especially for larger gardens, but will require more time. If you’re using seeds, plan on dispersing them the fall or late winter ahead of your summer growing season. This gives the seeds time to germinate. Nursery-started plants cost more, but will generally give you a quick return on your investment and bring pollinators into your yard during the same growing season.

Planting your garden


A pollinator habitat sign posted in a blooming pollinator garden. Photo by USDA.

When you’re ready to start planting, you’ll need your seeds or plants along with essentials like gardening tools to break the soil as well as extra soil or compost and mulch.

Prepping your garden

If you’re converting an existing lawn, you’ll need to remove grass and current plant cover and turn your soil to loosen it up. If you’re planning on using raised beds or containers, there are a lot of pre-made options available, as well as simple designs to build your own. No matter where you decide to plant your garden, you’ll want to add nutrient-rich compost or soil to improve the success of your garden.

Planting your seeds or flowers

When you’re using seeds, keep in mind that they will need time to germinate, so fall and late winter are ideal times to get started. In the fall, disperse seeds and cover with soil. In the late winter, scatter seeds over the snow. The sun will heat up the seeds and help anchor them into the snow. The melted snow provides moisture that will help the seeds germinate.

If you’re starting with small plants, make sure you follow frost guidance to avoid putting your plants in too early. Dig holes just big enough for the root system, then cover and reinforce the roots with soil or compost. Add mulch to reduce weed growth.

Wait, watch, water and weed

It may take some time, but you will eventually see butterflies and other pollinators enjoying your garden. Make sure to weed and water your garden to keep it healthy. Keep in mind that it may take a couple seasons for milkweed to start producing flowers.

We wish you the best of luck with your pollinator garden. Thank you for making a difference for butterflies, bees and other pollinators!

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service.

Looking for more content? You can connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For multimedia, check out our videos on YouTube and download photos on Flickr.


Pollinator-Friendly Lawns

The weekend before last I had the pleasure of meeting Heather Holm, a great gardener and leading advocate for pollinators from Minneapolis. She has self-published two very useful (and attractive) books: Pollinators of Native Plants (2014) and the multiple-award-winning Bees: An Identification and Native Plant Forage Guide (2017).

Heather told me about her own lawn, which she has overseeded with fine fescues and now mows just three times a year, with a reel mower set to the highest mowing height. This more meadow-like condition has encouraged flowers from her surrounding beds to infiltrate. As well as two species of violets, her lawn now sports woodland phlox, wild geranium and avens. The net result has been to transform this area from a green desert (biologically speaking) to a happy refuge for pollinators.

This is one area of the landscape where even a small change in maintenance can have a big impact. A study by US Forest Service of 16 suburban lawns in Springfield, Massachusetts found that reducing the frequency of mowing from weekly to once every two weeks can have a dramatic impact on the turf’s attractiveness to bees. This is because weeds such as clover and dandelions that were routinely decapitated had a chance to bloom when mowing was postponed for just one week. Presumably, it was the pollen and nectar these flowers offered that increased bee visitations to the lawn by slightly more than a third. The diversity of the bees was impressive, too – the researchers identified 93 different species of bees visiting these small patches of turf.

This should just be a beginning. Why not deliberately introduce wildflowers into our lawns? I have naturalized Crocus chrysanthus, snow crocuses, in my lawn and because the grass, like Heather Holm’s, is a mixture of fine fescues that needs mowing only a couple of times a summer, the crocuses have performed as true perennials, returning year after year. I planted these flowers because I love the very early spring color they provide, but they are also a fine early food source for bees and other pollinators. The tiny bluets (Houstonia caerulea) that have colonized my turf on their own are also an early food source, mostly for small bee flies as well as native bees.

In an era when grasslands are disappearing from much of the Northeast, lawns could provide a refuge for grassland flowers and their pollinators. I’ve been planting violet wood sorrel into a small patch of sheep fescue (Festuca ovina) in the front yard of our Berkshire cottage. This meadow flower, once common in Massachusetts, is now found in only six wild colonies state-wide. My hope is that my lawn can provide a seventh.

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About the Author: Thomas Christopher

My father was a compulsive tree planter, but it was my mother who taught me the finer points of gardening.

Her homeschooling was followed by two years in the New York Botanical Garden’s School of Professional Horticulture, and then ten years as horticulturist at an Olmsted Brothers designed estate on the Hudson River Palisades.

I’ve worked as a horticultural journalist for 35 years, contributing to publications ranging from Martha Stewart Living to the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society and The New York Times. My most recent book is Nature Into Art: The Gardens of Wave Hill, which is a tour of the lessons to be learned from that great public garden. I’m currently focusing on my new podcast (at thomaschristophergardens.com) which features weekly interviews with leaders of environmentally-informed gardening.

My special enthusiasms include sustainable gardening, especially sustainable lawns heirloom chicken breeds and recreating vintage New England hard ciders.


Please the bees: how to keep your garden pollinator-friendly

With the weather warming up, are you itching to get outside and work on your garden?

According to local pollination experts, you should hang on a little while longer before tending to your flower beds.

Collingwood recently received word it is now one of 32 Bee City Canada communities in Ontario, and now that Collingwood has been declared a Bee City, residents might be wondering how to make their personal gardens more pollinator-friendly.

Anja Lowrance is a Simcoe County Master Gardener who lives in Collingwood.

“There were a lot of people doing that this weekend, raking up the leaves and debris that was left behind. When they’re doing that, they’re picking up many of the insects and are basically just putting them in the trash,” said Lowrance.

“When you clean up in the spring, you should wait until there’s been enough time for all those insects to wake up, and that usually means you have consistent daytime temperatures of about 10 C,” she said.

When dealing with hollow-stemmed plants, Lowrance said gardeners should employ a “chop and drop” method, where any discarded foliage is left on the ground, providing natural mulch or compost for the grass.

“It would also leave tubes that some of the solitary bees could use as nests,” she said.

Lowrance also said you should avoid walking on your lawn until the temperatures get a little higher, because it can damage your grass.

When you’re starting to decide on which plants you’d like to bring in to your garden this season, Jessica Lehr, one of the founders of Pollinate Collingwood, also has ideas on which plants will encourage pollination.

“Our big message is to try to add some native pollinator plants. We’re not asking people to rip up their gardens, but maybe just add some more diversity, which increases biodiversity,” said Lehr. “They’re going to thrive really well and won’t need as much upkeep as other plants.”

Some examples of native plants that will grow well in Simcoe County are Milkweed, which attracts Monarch butterflies or Pearly Everlasting, which will attract American painted lady butterflies. Mourning cloak butterflies are attracted to Pussy Willows.

Native shrubs will also encourage pollination. Like species should also be grouped together in the garden whenever possible.

According to Lehr, pollinators – including bees, butterflies, beetles and flies – are important for supporting healthy environments and pollinating many of the fruits and vegetables that we eat.

Lehr is delighted that Collingwood has now been named a Bee City.

“It’s amazing. I think the big thing, to me, is this is an amazing town and community initiative,” said Lehr. “Now, we’d really like to work on getting native pollinators into people’s backyards.”

Over the winter Pollinate Collingwood, Blue Mountain Watershed Trust, Environment Network, Collingwood BIA and staff from the town’s parks, recreation and culture department put together a successful application for a Bee City Canada designation for the Town of Collingwood.

For the application, a community must show evidence of past and current efforts to support pollinators, as well as educational opportunities for the community to learn about and how to support pollinators.

Past community successes in Collingwood include habitat rehabilitation with native trees, shrubs and plants, a town pesticide bylaw in place prior to Ontario’s laws, creation of naturalized areas in local parks, natural landscaping courses, Gardening Action Kits, enerscaping workshops, native plant sales, summer camp programs focusing on native plants and pollinators, and the planting of 15 community Butterflyway gardens and nine school Butterflyway gardens under the David Suzuki Foundation.

Other initiatives this year include the town planting pollinator gardens along Ste. Marie Street and at the town welcome signs, BIA planting pollinator gardens in a variety of locations, a native tree and plant sale, a rain barrel event and educational opportunities.

“It continually amazes me, everything that’s happened in the past year,” said Lehr. “The momentum is awesome.”

The Master Gardeners of Ontario is a non-profit volunteer organization comprised of individuals who are certified horticultural experts providing in-depth sustainable gardening information to the general public. For more information on how to become a Simcoe County Master Gardener, click here.

For more information on Pollinate Collingwood, follow them on Facebook here.


Pollinator gardens are a nice way to provision hungry pollinators with some food. If you live in an urban setting or have a small yard, then a pollinator garden might be the best style of pollinator planting for you.

The best pollinator gardens contain a diverse range of flowering plants. Just like us, pollinators need a varied diet to be healthy. Additionally, good plant diversity reduces pest problems. Pests are generally less attracted to diverse gardens. Diverse gardens support more natural enemies, which are insects that eat pests. Another trait of a great pollinator garden is overlapping bloom throughout the season, otherwise pollinators can have difficulty finding food at all times of the growing season.

Not only does it help to have a diverse garden, it is also advantageous to use native plants because they are most useful for native pollinators. Native plants that are well-adapted to your local environment don’t require much water or care. Another benefit of native plants is that they have deep root structures, which help prevent erosion of soil in your yard. One drawback is that native plants tend to cost more than other varieties. Another drawback is the initial time it takes for the flowers to establish. You likely won’t see a benefit from your native plantings for 2-3 years unless you buy plugs. However, perennial native plants will reseed themselves, giving you and native pollinators years of benefits.

When choosing plants for your pollinator garden, keep in mind that native plants are not the same as wildflowers. Wildflower seed packets may or may not be adapted to your local environment. You also want to avoid planting hybrids if your goal is to support pollinators. Hybrid varieties might be pretty, but most do not produce much nectar and pollen for pollinators to eat.

You should also be wary of the pesticides used on nursery plants. Nurseries mean well, but they might sell plants with systemic pesticides which can end up in pollen and nectar. Pesticide use may not be labeled. When in doubt, ask the nurseries or buy seeds without pesticide coatings instead.

Below is a list of resources to help you start your very own pollinator garden:


Watch the video: Bees Not Lawns! How to Attract Pollinators


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