Survivor Pea Cultivation – Growing Survivor Peas In The Garden


By: Mary Ellen Ellis

Shelling peas that produce prolifically and that have a delicious flavor are great to grow for fresh use and also to can and stock the freezer for winter. Consider the Survivor pea plant if you are looking for a unique variety that will give you a lot of peas with a time to maturity of just over two months.

What are Survivor Peas?

For a shelling pea, Survivor plants are desirable for a number of reasons. This variety is self-trellising, so you don’t need to plant it against some type of structure to support its growth. It produces a lot of peas that are easy to pick, and it takes just 70 days to reach maturity from seed. Of course, the flavor of the pea is also important, and this one is superior.

The Survivor variety of pea was originally developed for commercial growing and to be harvested by machine because of its high-quality flavor and abundant production of pods. It is an avila-type pea, which means it has mostly tendrils at the top of the plant rather than leaves.

Each Survivor pea plant you grow will reach about 2 feet (.6 m.) tall and will produce abundant pods that hold about eight peas each. As a shelling pea, you won’t be able to eat the pods. Instead, shell the peas and eat them fresh or cooked, or preserve them by canning or freezing.

Growing Survivor Peas

Survivor pea cultivation is not difficult and is similar to that of other pea varieties. You can sow the seeds right in the ground and then thin the seedlings until they are spaced about 3 to 6 inches (7.6 to 15 cm.). Alternatively, start these seeds indoors before the last frost of spring and transplant them to the garden with the same spacing.

You can grow Survivor peas when the weather is cooler and get two harvests in late spring or early summer and again in mid-fall. Make sure the soil you grow the plants in soil that drains well and is rich enough to provide adequate nutrients.

Water your seedlings and plants regularly, but avoid soggy soil. After about 70 days from sowing the seeds, you should be ready to hand pick and shell your Survivor pea pods.

This article was last updated on


Planting A Green Manure Crop – How To Recharge Your Garden Soil This Spring!

If you are looking for a great way to recharge your tired garden soil before planting this year, an early spring green manure crop just might be the answer. Not only is it simple and economical, it adds serious power and nutrients to your soil. All before your garden plants go in the ground!

So what exactly is a green manure crop? Well, for starters, it has nothing at all to do with animals. Or for that matter, their manure. Instead, it’s a crop whose planting is for the sole purpose of giving its energy and nutrients right back to the soil.

Green manure crops are an excellent way to to add structure and organic matter, all while fixing nitrogen levels in the soil as well.On the surface, this process may sound very similar to the benefits of planting fall cover crops. And, to be sure, there are certainly a lot of similarities between the two.

Fast growing green manure crops like field peas not only add organic material to the soil, but also help to fix nitrogen levels for the next crop.

But instead of planting the crop in the fall to protect the soil through winter, a green manure crop is planted in season to grow quickly. It is then cut down and worked into the soil while it is still green, alive, and most importantly, full of nutrients.

When this process takes place, the “green” energy from the plant provides instant nutrients into the soil. And continues to do so as the plant material breaks down over time. Here is a look at when to plant green manure crops, and how to use them to recharge your soil this spring.


Purple hull peas the survivor of the garden

Mary Hightower, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture | Jun 23, 2011

Colorful and hardscrabble, the humble pink-eye purple hull pea has been elevated to a multicultural symbol of good luck and is even celebrated with its own Arkansas festival.

The peas have been cultivated for thousands of years and today are perhaps best known in the south for being served in Hoppin’ John, a traditional New Year’s Day dish, and at Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, for good luck. Each June, the pea is honored at the Purple Hull Pea Festival and World Championship Rotary Tiller Race in Emerson, Ark. This year’s festival runs from June 24 through June 25.

“Pink-eye purple hull peas are the survivor in the garden,” said Craig Andersen, horticulture extension specialist-vegetables with the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture. “They grow in poor, low-fertility soils, withstand heat and drought stress, and still produce a crop.”

Andersen said the “pink eye” part refers to where the seed attached to the pod, and the purple hull comes from a pigment called anthocyananin, the same chemical that puts the purple in pansies and the blush in the cheeks of apples.

“The truth is that the hull can be any color from a tan, to red or purple, and it does not determine the color of the peas,” he said, adding that the peas can be every color from white to black.

“We call them Southern peas and others may call them cowpeas, but the botanical group they belong to is the species ‘Vigna’,” Andersen said. “This includes everything from crowder peas, lady peas, and black-eyed peas to long bean, asparagus bean to red ripper beans.”

Peas have an advantage that helps them survive tough conditions.

“Because the genus has a symbiotic relationship with the bacteria Rhizobium that fix nitrogen from the atmosphere for the plants to use, Vigna needs little nitrogen fertilizer, and is one of the most important sources of vegetable protein for humans around the world,” he said. “We rarely inoculate the peas with the Rhizobium bacteria, because they have been grown in the South for so long that most soils already have a population of the bacteria.”

Black-eyed peas should be planted in a well-drained sandy loam soil. They do best if the soil pH is near 6.0 or above, with not much nitrogen fertilizer. Rhizobium bacteria in the soil will colonize the roots and provide nitrogen to the plant in exchange for carbohydrates from the plant.

It is a warm-season plant that does best when soil temperatures are above 62 degrees.

“We plant peas anytime from late spring to midsummer,” Andersen said. “Although peas are drought-tolerant, they do benefit from additional watering if needed at pod set, and pod filling. In about 48 to 55 days, you can start shelling peas.”

Young pods, where the peas have not filled out, can be used as “snaps” like green beans, or the peas can be left to fill out and shelled later. Leave the peas on the vine until the pods are dry and the seeds are dry, and you can store the peas throughout the winter. Soak them in water and rehydrate the peas when you are ready to use them. Many people prefer the taste of fresh peas, and will blanch and freeze them for later use.

“Peas have been passed down from one generation of gardeners to another. Save the seed from the best quality pods and allow them to dry with good air circulation. Shell them and store the peas in a glass jar in your freezer. This will help to preserve the viability of the seed and kill the larvae of any insects, such as weevils, that destroy stored seed.”


The Greatest Shell Pea You'll Ever Grow

  • SKU
  • Option
  • Ships in
  • Price
  • 86974 86974
  • 2 lbs of seeds
  • both Spring & Fall
  • $39.99
  • 80649 80649
  • 1/2 lb of seeds
  • both Spring & Fall
  • $12.99
  • 80648 80648
  • pkt of approx. 225 seeds
  • both Spring & Fall
  • $5.99
  • Plump, sweet peas with exceptional flavor
  • Each pod contains 8-10 peas
  • Ideal for canning, freezing & fresh eating
  • Vigorous vines produce high yields
  • The best shell pea you'll ever grow

Miragreen is a prolific variety that produces loads of dark green pods and will continue to produce for weeks to come. Miragreen produces 4- to 5-in. pod contains 8-10 plump, sweet peas, enough for canning, freezing and fresh eating. Heat-tolerant, Miragreen peas remain tender and delicious throughout the entire growing season. Vigorous 4-ft. vines require only a support on which to climb. 68 DAYS.

Seed counts: A packet of 225 pea seeds sows a 15-ft. row 1/2 lb. sows a 50-ft. row.
All Gurney's pea seed is treated.

Product Details

Product Details

  • Botanical Name: Pisum sativum 'Miragreen'
  • Height: 36 - 48 inch vine, requires staking.
  • Spacing: Simply broadcast the seed in the row, allowing the seeds to fall as they may, some even touching. Cover with an inch of soil in the spring two inches in the summer for your fall crop. Don't thin the pea plants when they germinate.
  • Depth: 1 - 1.5 inches
  • Spread: 12 inches.
  • Light Required: Full Sun
  • Yield: 20 lbs./ 100 foot row.
  • Size: 2 Lb
  • Fruit: Garden pea, normal foliage, dark blue-green. Long pods 4-5 inches with an average of 8 peas per pod.
  • Days To Maturity: 68 Days
  • Zone: 3-9
  • Germination: 7 - 10 Days
  • Form: Vegetable, Pea, Shell Pea
  • Soil Requirements: Loamy Soil, Sandy Soil
  • Growth Rate: Medium growth rate.
  • Seed Count: Approximately 225 seeds per packet., 1/2 lb is approximately 680 seeds.
  • Foliage: Dark blue-green foliage.
  • Botanical Name: Pisum sativum 'Miragreen'
  • Height: 36 - 48 inch vine, requires staking.
  • Spacing: Simply broadcast the seed in the row, allowing the seeds to fall as they may, some even touching. Cover with an inch of soil in the spring two inches in the summer for your fall crop. Don't thin the pea plants when they germinate.
  • Depth: 1 - 1.5 inches
  • Spread: 12 inches.
  • Light Required: Full Sun
  • Yield: 20 lbs./ 100 foot row.
  • Size: 1/2 Lb
  • Fruit: Garden pea, normal foliage, dark blue-green. Long pods 4-5 inches with an average of 8 peas per pod.
  • Days To Maturity: 68 Days
  • Zone: 3-9
  • Germination: 7 - 10 Days
  • Form: Vegetable, Pea, Shell Pea
  • Soil Requirements: Loamy Soil, Sandy Soil
  • Growth Rate: Medium growth rate.
  • Seed Count: Approximately 225 seeds per packet., 1/2 lb is approximately 680 seeds.
  • Foliage: Dark blue-green foliage.
  • Botanical Name: Pisum sativum 'Miragreen'
  • Height: 36 - 48 inch vine, requires staking.
  • Spacing: Simply broadcast the seed in the row, allowing the seeds to fall as they may, some even touching. Cover with an inch of soil in the spring two inches in the summer for your fall crop. Don't thin the pea plants when they germinate.
  • Depth: 1 - 1.5 inches
  • Spread: 12 inches.
  • Light Required: Full Sun
  • Yield: 20 lbs./ 100 foot row.
  • Size: 225 Seed Pkt
  • Fruit: Garden pea, normal foliage, dark blue-green. Long pods 4-5 inches with an average of 8 peas per pod.
  • Days To Maturity: 68 Days
  • Zone: 3-9
  • Germination: 7 - 10 Days
  • Form: Vegetable, Pea, Shell Pea
  • Soil Requirements: Loamy Soil, Sandy Soil
  • Growth Rate: Medium growth rate.
  • Seed Count: Approximately 225 seeds per packet., 1/2 lb is approximately 680 seeds.
  • Foliage: Dark blue-green foliage.

You may also like

Reviews

Reviews

Question & Answers

Question & Answers

Most times, orders having items with different shipping schedules are held in full until the entire order is ready to ship based on your grow zone.

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Spring 2021 Shipping Schedule for Plants
ZONE SEEDS
1A to 4A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
4B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
5A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
5B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
6A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
6B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
7A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
7B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
8A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
9A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
10A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
Last Order Date All Grow Zones:6/11/2021

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.

Most times, orders having items with different shipping schedules are held in full until the entire order is ready to ship based on your grow zone.

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Spring 2021 Shipping Schedule for Plants
ZONE SEEDS
1A to 4A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
4B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
5A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
5B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
6A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
6B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
7A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
7B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
8A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
9A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
10A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
Last Order Date All Grow Zones:6/11/2021

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.

Most times, orders having items with different shipping schedules are held in full until the entire order is ready to ship based on your grow zone.

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Spring 2021 Shipping Schedule for Plants
ZONE SEEDS
1A to 4A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
4B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
5A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
5B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
6A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
6B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
7A 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
7B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
8A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
9A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
10A & B 10/27/20 - 6/14/21
Last Order Date All Grow Zones:6/11/2021

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.


Next, Mendel took the first generation plants and mated them with each other. What color seeds would you expect the next generation to have? To Mendel’s surprise, 25% of the offspring, called the F2 (or second) generation, actually had green seeds, even though all of the F1 parent plants had yellow seeds!

This result led Mendel to believe that it was possible for a trait to be present, but not visible, in an individual. Something from the original green parent plants was skipping a generation and being passed to the grandchildren. Mendel repeated this experiment with many different characteristics. He tested inner pea color, outer pea color, pea shape, flower position, stem length, unripe pod color, and pod shape. He had similar results every single time.

How is this possible? Let’s take a closer look at what’s happening on a genetic level with the help of a Punnett Square.

Additional images via Wikimedia Commons. Pea plant flower via AnRo0002. Purple sweet pea flower taken by Giligone.


Watch the video: Plants VS Zombies Survival Endless BEST GLITCHSTRATEGY 2019


Previous Article

Dracena problems - The expert responds on the diseases of the dracena

Next Article

Sowing calendar for December