Heirloom Cabbage Info: Tips For Growing Danish Ballhead Cabbage Plants


By: Teo Spengler

Cabbageis a popular wintercrop in this country, and Danish Ballhead heirloom cabbage is among the topfavorite varieties. For over a century, Danish Ballhead cabbage plants havebeen grown as dependable wintercrops in cool locations.

If you are interested in growing this type of cabbage, readon. We’ll give you information on this variety and tips on Danish Ballhead cabbagecare.

Danish Ballhead Heirloom Cabbage

Europeans have been growing Danish Ballhead for centuries.The early strain of this heirloomvegetable was the Danish variety Amager, named for the island of Amagernear Copenhagen. It was cultivated as far back as the 15th century.

Specimens of this cabbage variety were introduced to theUnited States in 1887 as Danish Ballhead cabbage plants. It is known as areliable storage type cabbage that resists both boltingand splitting.The heads are solid and offer a sweet, mild flavor that makes them great forboiling, slaws, and kraut.

Danish Ballhead Cabbage Seeds

If you are interested in growing Danish Ballhead cabbage,you’ll be pleased to learn that it isn’t very difficult. The variety doesespecially well in the northeast and mountainous regions. It doesn’t grow aswell in hot areas. However, once the plants are established, they can withstandhot, dry weather and do not rot in wet seasons.

You can easily find Danish Ballhead cabbage seeds online orat your local garden store. Given the name, it is no surprise that the seedsproduce round heads of cabbage, a lovely blue-green in color. They mature after100 days and grow to about 10 inches (25 cm.) in diameter.

Danish Ballhead Cabbage Care

If you are starting Danish Ballhead cabbage seeds indoors,do so 4 to 6 weeks before the last spring frost. Transplant to the garden justbefore that lastfrost date. For outdoor planting, wait until early spring or mid-summer.

Plant the seeds at a depth of ½ inch (1.27 cm.). Cabbagecare should include regular irrigation and fertilizer as well as mulching to helpthe soil retain moisture. Plants mature to 12-14 inches (30-36 cm.) talland 24-28 inches (61-71 cm.) wide. The heads produced are hard and tight andthey store extremely well.

This article was last updated on


How To Grow

Cabbage is another member of the Brassica family that is full of nutrients, including vitamins A, B1, B2, and C, as well as various antioxidants. The American Cancer Society strongly urges an increased intake of cabbage and other Brassicas in the diets of North Americans. Eating lots of cabbage may also protect the eyes from macular degeneration. To preserve its vitamins and mineral content, do not overcook cabbage. Store cut cabbage in the refrigerator in a plastic bag with holes in it and use as soon as possible. Cabbages are also highly ornamental in the garden -choose varieties for colour, deep-red, blue-green, dark-green or leaf texture, savoyed (crinkled), or flat leaf. To learn How to Grow Cabbage follow the easy instructions below.

Latin
Brassica oleracea var. capitata
Family: Brassicaceae

Difficulty
Moderately difficult

We Recommend: Charmant (CB231) . For a standard green, summer harvest cabbage, Charmant is a great choice. Other cabbages have their selling points, and they’re all good but if your are new to cabbage growing, try Charmant.

Season & Zone
Season: Cool season
Exposure: Full-sun
Zone: 3-10

Timing
Sow indoors beginning in March and transplant outdoors from April to the end of July. Overwintering cabbage is sown outdoors during July. Optimal soil temperature: 10-30°C (50-85°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-10 days.

Starting
When learning how to grow cabbage, sow 3 or 4 seeds per pot, 5mm (¼”) deep, under very bright light. Thin to the strongest plant. Space transplants 45-60cm (18-24″) apart in rows 60-90cm (24-36″) apart.

Growing
Ideal pH: 6.5-7.0. Cabbage does best in humus-rich soil amended with composted manure. Mix ½ cup complete organic fertilizer into the soil beneath each transplant. If growth slows, side dress with a little more complete organic fertilizer. Heads of early varieties can split from over-maturity, rapid growth after heavy rain, or irrigation after dry spells. Splits can be delayed by twisting the plant or cultivating deeply next to plants in order to break roots and slow growth. Fall and winter varieties stand in the garden longer without splitting. If direct sown, add 20-25 days to the maturity date.

If your cabbage won’t form heads, it may be from an imbalance of too much nitrogen in the soil in relation to phosphorus. Cabbages require cool temperatures to form heads well. Hot weather can interfere with the development of heads.

Harvest
Cabbage heads are ready when they’re firm to the touch, and when the interior is fairly dense. Heads will split when they’re allowed to overly mature. Rapid growth due to excess watering and fertility will also cause splitting of the head. Plant early, mid-season and late varieties to spread out your harvest. Late varieties tend to be better for storage or for making sauerkraut. Early varieties tend not to store well.

Seed Info
In optimum conditions at least 80% of seeds should germinate. Uual seed life: 3 years. Per 100′ row: 200 seeds, per acre: 44M seeds.

Diseases & Pests
Diseases
Purple blotch (Alternaria porri) – Avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so plant parts above the ground dry as quickly as possible. Allow for air circulation, and avoid crowding plants. Pull weeds around plants and garden area to increase air circulation. When plants are not wet, remove and destroy affected plant parts. In autumn rake and destroy all fallen or diseased leaves and fruit.
Clubroot – If soil infested, add lime to raise soil pH to 7.2. Locate new plants in part of garden different from previous year’s location. If that is not possible, remove infested soil and replace with fresh soil. Purchase healthy transplants or start seed in sterile potting mix or fresh ground. Remove and discard or destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.

Pests
Flea Beetles – Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in mid-summer. Control weeds.
Cutworms – Control weeds. Cardboard collars around each plant give good protection.
Cabbage root maggot – White maggot larvae tunnel in and feed on roots of plants. Damage causes wilting early on, death of plants later on. Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage.
Cabbageworms – Handpick and destroy. Row covers may be useful on small plantings to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer.
Cabbage aphids – A hard stream of water can be used to remove aphids from plants. Wash off with water occasionally as needed early in the day. Check for evidence of natural enemies such as gray-brown or bloated parasitized aphids and the presence of alligator-like larvae of lady beetles and lacewings.

Companion Planting
All Brassicas benefit from chamomile, dill, mint, rosemary, and sage. Avoid planting near eggplants, peppers, potatoes, or tomatoes.

Matures in 120 days. (Open-pollinated seeds)

[description action="end"][quickfacts action="start quickfacts"]

  • Mild and tender
  • Good for sauerkraut, coleslaw, or cooking
  • Big 8-25cm (7-10") well protected heads
  • Open-pollinated seeds
  • Matures in 120 days
[quickfacts action="end quickfacts"]">


Good keeper, excellent for all purposes, especially good for sauerkraut. Home garden.

Attributes

Growing Tips

Transplant early cabbage soon enough that it matures before the heat of summer. Planting two or three varieties with different maturities can provide harvest over a longer period of time. Late cabbage must be started during the heat of mid-summer, but it develops its main head during the cooling weather of fall. It may be transplanted or direct seeded. Plants should be planted 12” - 24” apart depending on variety and the desired head size. Sow cabbage seeds ¼” - ½” deep.

Use starter fertilizer when transplanting and side-dress with nitrogen after plants are half grown. Keep your plants out of intense sunlight and heat of summer. Common problems are Yellow or Fusarium Wilt, as well as cabbage worms.

Cabbage can be harvested anytime after the head has formed. For highest yield, cut the cabbage heads when they are solid (firm to hand pressure) but before they crack or split. When heads are mature, a rain may cause heads to crack or split.

Fresh, uncut heads of cabbage can be stored in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Cover loosely with a plastic bag or use perforated bags. Do not wash cabbage before storing the extra moisture will hasten deterioration.


    The Danish Ballhead is an old-time favorite which grows well during the winter months.

- Danish Ballhead produces sizable 7-10 inch heads weighing up to 5-6 pounds/each.

- The interior flesh is light green, mild, and tender.

- It is a very dependable general-purpose cabbage for kraut, slaw, and cooking.

  • Day to Maturity | 90 days
  • Additional Details

    Did you know? Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin C! It also contains significant amounts of glutamine, an amino acid that has anti-inflammatory properties. Cabbage can also be included in dieting programs, as it is a low calorie food.


    Cabbage, Danish Ballhead (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO)

      The Danish Ballhead is an old-time favorite which grows well during the winter months.

    - Danish Ballhead produces sizable 7-10 inch heads weighing up to 5-6 pounds/each.

    - The interior flesh is light green, mild, and tender.

    - It is a very dependable general-purpose cabbage for kraut, slaw, and cooking.

  • Day to Maturity | 90 days
  • Additional Details

    Did you know? Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin C! It also contains significant amounts of glutamine, an amino acid that has anti-inflammatory properties. Cabbage can also be included in dieting programs, as it is a low calorie food.


    Watch the video: A Guide to Cabbage Varieties and When to Plant Them


    Previous Article

    Dracena problems - The expert responds on the diseases of the dracena

    Next Article

    Sowing calendar for December