Echeveria setosa var. deminuta (Firecracker Plant)


Scientific Name

Echeveria setosa var. deminuta J. Meyrán

Common Names

Firecracker Plant

Synonyms

Echeveria rondelii

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Echeveria

Description

Echeveria setosa var. deminuta is an attractive succulent that produces an abundance of new offsets each season. It grows in thick clusters of blue-green, club-shaped leaves. Foliage is covered with white bristles, which turn into tufts on the leaf tips. It is commonly called the Firecracker Plant because of the bright red and yellow flowers. Rosettes grow up to 1.2 inches (3 cm) in diameter. When flowering, the bright nodding blossoms contrast nicely with the blue-green hairy leaves, making it one of the most beautiful of the genus.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Most of the common Echeveria species are not complicated succulents to grow, provided you follow a few basic rules. First, be careful never to let water sit in the rosette as it can cause rot or fungal diseases that will kill the plant. Additionally, remove dead leaves from the bottom of the plant as it grows. These dead leaves provide a haven for pests, and Echeverias are susceptible to mealy bugs. As with all succulents, careful watering habits and plenty of light will help ensure success.

Most Echeveria can be easily propagated from leaf cuttings, although a few are better from seeds or stem cuttings. To propagate a leaf cutting, place the individual leaf in a succulent or cacti mix and cover the dish until the new plant sprouts.

Repot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To repot a succulent, make sure the soil is dry before repotting, then gently remove the pot. See more at How to Grow and Care for Echeveria.

Origin

Native to Mexico (mountains of Oaxaca and Puebla).

Links

  • Back to genus Echeveria
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Echeveria setosa var. deminuta (Firecracker Plant) – Succulent plants

Echeveria setosa var. deminuta (Firecracker Plant) is an ornamental, evergreen succulent which produces an abundance of new “hairy” offsets each season. It grows in thick clusters of blue-green, club-shaped leaves. Foliage is covered with white bristles which turn into tufts on the leaf tips. It is popularly called a “Firecracker Plant” because of the bright red and yellow flowers. The rosettes are up to 3 cm in diameter. When blooming, the bright nodding blooms contrast nicely with the blue-green hairy leaves, making it one of the most beautiful of the genus.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Echeveria

Scientific Name: Echeveria setosa var. deminuta
Synonyms: Echeveria rondelii
Common Names: Firecracker Plant

How to grow and maintain Echeveria setosa var. deminuta:

Light:
It thrives best in full sun to light shade. In indoor an east or west-facing window where they receive four to six hours of sunlight is ideal.

Soil:
It grows well in a well-drained succulent mix, with an ideal pH around 6.0 (slightly acidic) or an equal part sharp sand with all-purpose potting mix.

Water:
Water Echeveria plant regularly during the summer and spring. keep the soil evenly moist but not soggy. You can allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. Reduce water in the winter.

Temperature:
It prefers an average summer temperature of 65ºF / 18ºC – 70ºF / 21ºC. In winter, cool to 50ºF / 10ºC.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize with a controlled-release fertilizer at the beginning of the season or weekly with a weak liquid solution. Use a balanced 20-20-20 fertilizer at 1/4 strength on mature plants, and a fertilizer with less nitrogen on young plants.

Re-potting:
Re-pot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To re-pot, a succulent, make sure the soil is dry before re-potting, then gently remove the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide. Place the plant in its new pot and backfill with potting soil, spreading the roots out as you re-pot. Leave the plant dry for a week or so, then begin to water lightly to reduce the risk of root rot.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by seeds, offsets or leaf cuttings in spring. To propagate a leaf cutting, place the individual leaf in a succulent or cacti mix and cover the dish until the new plant sprouts.

Pests and Diseases:

It has no serious pest or disease problems. Mealybugs can be a problem, and if dead leaves are not expelled from the plant, it can attract other insect pests or have problems with fungus.


Echeveria setosa var deminuta

Echeveria setosa var deminuta

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Description

Echeveria setosa var. deminuta grows in thick clusters of sky blue, club shaped leaves. Foliage is covered with white bristles which turn into tufts on the leaf tips. This plant is also popularly called a "Firecracker Plant" because of the bright red and yellow flowers. Water regularly during the first growing season to establish a good root system. Great variety for containers, windowsills and in rock gardens. Grows well in rocky, unimproved soil. Not cold hardy.

Foliage Color:
Mature Size:
Shipping Size:

You'll receive approx. a 3-4" pot sized plant.
All plants are shipped bare root with an established, healthy root system.

Growth Rate:
Cold Hardiness Zones:

9-11 View Map
Cold Hardy to 20° to 30°F

Succulent Overview:

Echeveria are some of the most colorful and spectacular succulent plants. They grow very large with thick succulent leaves in a rosette form. Echeveria succulent plants are originally from Mexico and Central America. Bell shaped flowers on long stems can be yellow, orange, red or pink. Some varieties are more tolerant of wet and cold than others. All echeveria can withstand fairly cold temperatures if the soil they are planted in is dry and there isn't any water on the leaves. Frequent rain and cold on their leaves will cause rot and disease. As the plants grow, remove the dead leaves at the plant's base. Echeveria can look amazing in containers, and mass plantings.

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Echeveria setosa var. deminuta 'Firecracker Plant'

Known for its abundant production of offsets, Echeveria setosa var. deminuta 'Firecracker Plant' features dense, mounded rosettes of especially chubby blue leaves. Coated in white bristles that form tufts at the tips of each leaf, this variety adds a heavy dose of texture to any container arrangement or temperate rock garden, where it will quickly begin to cover the ground in clusters of petite, 2-inch rosettes. Drawing its name from the vibrant sprays of red and yellow blooms that it sends up during the active growing season, ‘Firecracker Plant’ is a must-have for even the most seasoned succulent collector.

To retain its rich coloration and to maintain the compact form of its unique rosettes, be sure to provide ‘Firecracker Plant’ with plenty of bright sunlight. When it comes to watering, the goal is to replicate the drought conditions of its native Mexican habitat – which can be accomplished by watering thoroughly but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry completely in between. Porous soil within a well-draining pot, coupled with ample airflow around the leaves and soil surface, will further ensure your success with this unique variety.

Hardy only to Zone 9, be sure to shield this cultivar from freezing temperatures, which could otherwise permanently disfigure its leaves.

Shipping Information
All plants are shipped bare-root, without soil or their original nursery pot. Orders ship Monday-Friday each week. Please allow 1-3 business days for your order to be processed.

Plant Size & Appearance
Plant sizing is based on the diameter of the nursery pot (2.5", 4", 5" etc). Plants may be slightly larger or smaller than the pot they are grown in, depending on availability or time of year. While we do our best to ship plants as similar to those pictured as possible, please keep in mind that all plants are unique from one to the next, and display color, shape, and growth variation based on current environment, time of year, and other contributing factors. Please note that we ship our plants as dry as possible in the fall and winter months to prevent rot and or freezing of the plants. They will plump back up after planting :)

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Known for its abundant production of offsets, Echeveria setosa var. deminuta 'Firecracker Plant' features dense, mounded rosettes of especially chubby blue leaves. Coated in white bristles that form tufts at the tips of each leaf, this variety adds a heavy dose of texture to any container arrangement or temperate rock garden, where it will quickly begin to cover the ground in clusters of petite, 2-inch rosettes. Drawing its name from the vibrant sprays of red and yellow blooms that it sends up during the active growing season, ‘Firecracker Plant’ is a must-have for even the most seasoned succulent collector.

To retain its rich coloration and to maintain the compact form of its unique rosettes, be sure to provide ‘Firecracker Plant’ with plenty of bright sunlight. When it comes to watering, the goal is to replicate the drought conditions of its native Mexican habitat – which can be accomplished by watering thoroughly but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry completely in between. Porous soil within a well-draining pot, coupled with ample airflow around the leaves and soil surface, will further ensure your success with this unique variety.

Hardy only to Zone 9, be sure to shield this cultivar from freezing temperatures, which could otherwise permanently disfigure its leaves.

Known for its abundant production of offsets, Echeveria setosa var. deminuta 'Firecracker Plant' features dense, mounded rosettes of especially chubby blue leaves. Coated in white bristles that form tufts at the tips of each leaf, this variety adds a heavy dose of texture to any container arrangement or temperate rock garden, where it will quickly begin to cover the ground in clusters of petite, 2-inch rosettes. Drawing its name from the vibrant sprays of red and yellow blooms that it sends up during the active growing season, ‘Firecracker Plant’ is a must-have for even the most seasoned succulent collector.

To retain its rich coloration and to maintain the compact form of its unique rosettes, be sure to provide ‘Firecracker Plant’ with plenty of bright sunlight. When it comes to watering, the goal is to replicate the drought conditions of its native Mexican habitat – which can be accomplished by watering thoroughly but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry completely in between. Porous soil within a well-draining pot, coupled with ample airflow around the leaves and soil surface, will further ensure your success with this unique variety.

Hardy only to Zone 9, be sure to shield this cultivar from freezing temperatures, which could otherwise permanently disfigure its leaves.

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Echeveria setosa var. deminuta (Firecracker Plant) - garden

Origin and Habitat: Southern Mexico, mountains of Oaxaca and Puebla.

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echeveria setosa var. deminuta J.Meyran
Cact. Suc. Mex. 34(4): 76 (1989)
Synonymy: 2

  • Echeveria setosa var. deminuta J.Meyran
    • Echeveria rondelii Sterk
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echeveria setosa Rose & J.A.Purpus
Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 13: 45, pl. 10. 1910

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echeveria setosa var. ciliata (R.Moran) R.Moran
Cact. Succ. J. (Los Angeles) 65(1): 32. 1993
Synonymy: 2

  • Echeveria setosa var. ciliata (R.Moran) R.Moran
    • Echeveria ciliata R.Moran
Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echeveria setosa f. cristata hort.

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echeveria setosa var. minor R.Moran
Cact. Succ. J. (Los Angeles) 65(1): 35. 1993

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Echeveria setosa var. oteroi R.Moran
Cact. Succ. J. (Los Angeles) 65(1): 33. 1993

Description: Echeveria setosa is a very distinct echeveria, with a remarkable pubescence. It is very variable with many variety and cultivars - often quite different at a first glance - available in cultivation.
var. deminuta: This variety has tiny, blue, clubshaped leaves with only a tuft of bristles at the ends, the rosettes are no bigger than about 3 cm. It form dense many headed clusters. This plant has been in cultivation for some time as “Echeveria rundelii”
Habit: It is a low rosette forming succulent, freely giving off offsets from the base and readily forming dense mounds.
Stem: Almost stemless.
Leaves: Small, densely packed spatulate-shaped, convex on both sides, narrow, glaucous that in the winter assumes a green-red colouring, almost glabrous with a tuft of glistening hairs at tips.
Flowers: The flowers are the most distinctive and recognisable feature of this species, they are displayed in erect, arched helicoid cymes from each rosette that reach from about 15 cm to 20 cm tall, each with about 6 to 9 florets. In larger groups of rosettes, often of the inflorescences are branched. The flowers are red and yellow simple or 2 branched second cincinni. The corolla campanulate or ovoid urceolate, prominently pentagonal.
Blooming season: Spring and early summer.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Echeveria setosa group

  • Echeveria setosa" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Crassulaceae/12352/Echeveria_setosa'> Echeveria setosa Rose & J.A.Purpus : Almost glabrous to very furry with stiff, glistening white hairs, depending on the variety. it is a rosette succulent freely giving off offsets from the base and readily forming dense mounds.
  • Echeveria setosa var. ciliata (R.Moran) R.Moran : It is a broader leaved plant, with somewhat fewer bristles at the edges of the green leaves.
  • Echeveria setosa f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Crassulaceae/12359/Echeveria_setosa_f._cristata'> Echeveria setosa f. cristata hort. : Attractive crested form with very fuzzy, silvery leaves that feel to the touch like
    a cross between felt and velvet.
  • Echeveria setosa var. deminuta" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Crassulaceae/12355/Echeveria_setosa_var._deminuta'> Echeveria setosa var. deminuta J.Meyran : This plant has been in cultivation for some time as “E. rundelii” It has tiny, blue, clubshaped leaves with a tuft of bristles at the ends, the rosettes are no bigger than about 3 cm. It form dense many headed clusters.
  • Echeveria setosa var. minor R.Moran : It is a plant that combine the best of var. deminuta and var. ciliata, the leaves are covered with fine bristles, it form a a pale blue flattish rosette about 8 cm wide.
  • Echeveria setosa var. oteroi R.Moran

Notes: It has long been around in collections, and has widely been used because of its dense, fuzzy covering of short, white hairs, to produce several hybrids. The cross Echeveria harmsii x Echeveria setosa, for example, produced Echeveria 'Set-Oliver', popular in Britain. Other crosses elsewhere resulted in Echeveria 'Herzblut' in Germany and Echeveria 'Doris Taylor' in California, to name but a few. Crested clones are also known and highly valued by collectors.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures.
1) Werner Rauh “The Wonderful World of Succulents: Cultivation and Description of Selected Succulent Plants Other Than Cacti” Smithsonian Institution Press, 1984
2) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey "The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass" Cambridge University Press, 11/ago/2011
3) Hermann Jacobsen ”A Handbook of Succulent Plants: Abromeitiella to Euphorbia” Blandford Press, 1960


Echeveria setosa var. deminuta Photo by: Diego Armentano
- FO42 (Collector Felipe Otero) Locality: about 25km North of Concepcion de Buenavista, Sierra Mixteca, Oaxaca, Mexico. (syn. Echeveria rundellii hort. same as FO236) Photo by: Carolina González
Echeveria setosa var. deminuta Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Echeveria setosa var. deminuta Photo by: Edoardo Mattei
Echeveria setosa var. deminuta Photo by: Cactus Art
Echeveria setosa var. deminuta Photo by: Cactus Art
Echeveria setosa var. deminuta Photo by: Cactus Art
Echeveria setosa var. deminuta Photo by: Cactus Art

Cultivation and Propagation: Echeveria are easily grown succulents that can tolerate sun, shade, moist soils, dry soils, but look their best only when given adequate light levels and water, and ideally should be grown outdoors in full sun. Generally speaking, the more light a plant gets the better it will display its colours and shape. Bright light is required to prevent "stretching" of Echeverias ("stretching" occurs when a moderately fast growing plant such as an Echeveria, is grown in dim light or over-fertilized, which causes overly lush growth that contributes to weak, pallid plants). However, when moving plants from lower light conditions into full sun, be wary of sun scorch resulting from too rapid a transition into intense summer sunlight, most easily avoided by ensuring plants are well-watered before moving them on a cloudy day. Echeveria are able to tolerate extended dry periods and survive drought without the need for watering, but they will grow stronger if they receive adequate moisture during their growing season, but never allowing the plant to remain waterlogged (root rot sensitive). For this reason, it is essential in cultivation to use a very porous soil, which will allow quick drainage. Avoid overhead watering under humid conditions, especially during winter. Echeveria are shallow rooted plants, and therefore benefit from good levels of organic matter in the soil. Give it enough root space for optimum growth. Slow release fertilisers with a low to moderate nitrogen content incorporated into the potting mix are usually adequate for the spring and summer growing seasons of Echeveria, and additional fertiliser applications would not normally be required until spring. Good air movement is important for minimising pest and disease risks, and avoiding excessive humidity in cool winter conditions is important to successfully growing Echeveria in the nursery environment. Can tolerate light frosts. however, the ideal temperature range during the summer growing season is 5-25°C, with the cooler autumn temperatures tending to make their foliage colours become more intense than those of the active summer growing season. Aphids like this plant (and all flowering Echeverias).

Propagation:: It is easily propagated by cuttings in the spring. When the stem becomes too tall, just cut the top rosette with a piece of stem and plant it. It will soon take root, while the plant left with just the stem will soon grow new buds that can be in turn used for propagation. Time to take cuttings: April to July. It may also propagated by leaf propagation. If the plant is repotted some of the bottom leaves can be removed, in order to attempt propagation.. However some of the cuttings will dry out without producing a plantlet.


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